News & Media releases

Articles by year

Rockingham tackling fishing waste

Thanks to securing a $20,000 RecfishWest grant through the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), River Guardians is now actively seeking to install more Reel it in bins at popular coastal fishing locations.

The recognisable bins have recently been installed at Bent Street and Point Kennedy boat ramps, and Mercy Point Jetty. These new bins complement the bins that were installed in Marmion Marine Park (North Beach Jetty and Hillarys Boat Harbour) in 2019, and more recently, down in Busselton and Bunbury.

DBCA is also currently holding talks with the Cities of Joondalup and Wanneroo and will be installing more bins along the coastline in these areas over the coming months. Watch this space!

If you would like to adopt one of these new coastal bins or would simply like to know where the Reel it in bins have been installed to date, check out the locations map on our River Guardians website.

To learn more about the Reel it in project watch our video here.

Below: the new Reel it in bin at Bent Street

'Friends of Fremantle Ports' Volunteer Program

Fremantle Ports is launching a brand new community volunteering program called 'Friends of Fremantle Ports'.

Fremantle Ports are looking for people who have a strong affinity with, or connection to our Port who are interested in volunteering to help extend their outreach programs including Port Walks.

Ideal candidates may have worked in the maritime industry, or have a keen interest in port operations, history or shipping who feel they have the right skills and background to help us make a difference in our community.

For more information and to apply, go to their website here

Applications close COB Friday 7 August, 2020.

Moon spotted with new calf

Say hello to the Swan River’s newest arrival! 👋🐬

We are pleased to announce that our resident Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin population has welcomed a newborn calf! The youngster was spotted a few days ago alongside its mother, Moon, more than a year after she sadly lost her previous calf as a result of an entanglement.

Also spotted enthusiastically leaping out of the water this week was six-year-old Djinda, one of Moon’s previous calves and sister to the newborn calf!

To find out more about our Dolphin Watch program and the Swan Canning Riverpark’s resident dolphin population, check out our Dolphin Watch project.

Photos by Krista Nicholson, @Murdoch University

All clear for fishing and crabbing in the Swan and Canning rivers

The Department of Health has lifted warnings dating back to January 2020, not to eat fish or crabs collected from the Swan and Canning rivers.

The Department is now advising that the Swan and Canning rivers are all-clear for fishing and crabbing. However, the Department’s standing warning to avoid eating shellfish collected recreationally in rivers, estuaries or other waterways remains in place as the quality of these shellfish for consumption cannot be guaranteed.

Shellfish includes oysters, mussels, clams, pipis, scallops, cockles and razor clams.

Please see the latest DoH media statement here.

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions continues to conduct weekly water quality monitoring to track the extent of the bloom. We have also tested mussels, crabs and fish for the Alexandrium toxin and will repeat testing once the bloom subsides. DoH and local riverfront councils have installed health warning signs advising against eating shellfish, crabs and fish at key riverfront locations including jetties, boat ramps and key accessible foreshore areas within the affected region. It should be noted that swimming and other aquatic recreational activities on the Swan and Canning rivers are not impacted by the algal bloom, but as a general rule swimming should be avoided in areas of discoloured water.

Algal bloom update no. 5

The Department of Health (DoH) has extended its warning regarding the toxic Alexandrium algal bloom in the Swan and Canning rivers.  DoH is advising people not to eat fish, crabs or shellfish collected from within the following waterways:

Swan River – from Pelican Point, Crawley to the South of Perth Yacht Club, Applecross and upstream to Middle Swan (Reid Highway) Bridge, Middle Swan (this includes the commonly known areas of Como Jetty, Matilda Bay, Perth Waters, Elizabeth Quay, Barrack Street Jetty, Claisebrook Cove, Maylands Yacht Club, Ascot Waters, Hind Reserve, Riverside Gardens, Garvey Park, Sandy Beach Reserve, Point Reserve, Kings Meadow, Fish Market Reserve and Woodbridge Riverside Park).

Canning River – from the South of Perth Yacht Club and upstream to Kent Street Weir (this includes commonly known areas of Canning Bridge, Mt Henry Bridge, Salter Point, Shelley Bridge, Riverton Bridge, and Castledare).

A map of the impacted area is attached. 

Alexandrium toxins can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning and cooking will not destroy these toxins.

Please see the latest DoH media statement here.

The Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions continues to conduct weekly water quality monitoring at an increased number of sites to track the extent of the bloom. We are also testing mussels and crabs for the Alexandrium toxin. DoH and local riverfront councils have arranged for health warning signs advising against crabbing, shellfish collection and fishing to be erected at key riverfront locations including jetties, boat ramps and key accessible foreshore areas within the affected region. It should be noted that swimming and other aquatic recreational activities on the Swan and Canning rivers are not impacted by the algal bloom, but as a general rule swimming should be avoided in areas of discoloured water.

Further information is provided in detailed FAQ’s available at https://www.dbca.wa.gov.au/science/riverpark-monitoring